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GMOs and Food


Public officials impress local farmer in Washington

First Posted: 10:27 am - April 12th, 2018 - Views

By Amanda Rockhold - arockhold@aimmediamidwest.com



Left to right: Kevin Dull of the Montgomery County Farm Bureau; Brandi Montgomery, Fayette County Farm Bureau President; Greene County Farm Bureau President Daniel Jones; and Congressman Michael Turner on Capitol Hill during the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (left) and Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs spoke to more than 100 Farm Bureau members in Washington D.C.
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt touched on water quality during breakfast at the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.
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WASHINGTON D.C. — Greene County Farm Bureau President Daniel Jones was impressed with how interested public officials were in what he had to say during the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.

Jones, along with more than 100 other Ohio Farm Bureau members, connected with national leaders and policy-makers at the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau Presidents’ Trip, March. 13-15, in Washington D.C.

“They’re listening to us,” said Jones, who is a full-time, fourth generation farmer of corn, beans, heirloom, and wheat. “The people we’re talking to — I hope we’re giving them some new ideas of what’s happening out on the farm that maybe they haven’t heard of.”

The lineup of who Jones was able to hear from and ask questions included: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan; Ohio Senators Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman; Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt; American Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall; USDA Undersecretary, Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs Ted McKinney; Canadian Embassy representatives; Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs; and many others.

Jones emphasized that it’s not every day that those in Washington hear directly from county farmers, “where we’re coming from, what we’re doing and what our problems are.” The attendees were able to meet with their congressional representatives on Capitol Hill. Jones was able to speak directly with Congressman Mike Turner about crop insurance, agriculture technology and how to improve the quality of food.

Bob Latta was one of the representatives that attendees met with, who posed the question for regulators, “Have you ever been out to see what you regulate?” He added that the 2018 Farm Bill bill will be “tweaked” and said that the “country overall is polarized.” He also emphasized that people need to understand where their food comes from.

The 2018 Farm Bill was a hot topic throughout the three-day event. During the trip, the Farm Bill was extended until after Easter break, as negotiations about SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) and labor regulations continued among Washington.

Senator Sherrod Brown spoke to the group during breakfast, focusing on the 2018 Farm Bill. Brown said that during his work on the 2007 Farm Bill, he had to “brush up” on certain Ag programs and policies. He added the best way for him to do that was to listen to farmers.

“The best ideas don’t come out of Washington,” said Brown. “The Senate Ag Committee is important, but that’s not where the real innovation happens in our food supply chain.”

He also alluded to the round-tables he has had throughout Ohio, discussing important issues with various communities.

“One of the most important things we do on the Ag committee is to help the places that are too often overlooked by Washington,” said Brown. He added that his hope is to finish the Farm Bill by September.

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) also spoke to the Ohio County Farm Bureau members at breakfast. The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) awarded Portman with AFBF’s Golden Plow award. Portman said that he recently purchased a farm, “a little piece of land,” in Warren County, with about 140 acres in row crops. He said that he is excited to get more involved with the Farm Bureau.

“I am really honored to represent the farmers and ranchers of our country. And in Ohio, Agriculture’s number one,” said Portman, emphasizing that half of Ohio is farmland. “We’re the biggest single industry in Ohio and that makes me really proud.”

He emphasized how farmers are struggling to find workers and the importance of the Regulatory Accountability Act (RAA), which aims to revise the federal rulemaking process.

“The Regulatory Accountability Act is really important,” said Portman. “We’re looking at way to fit it into the infrastructure bill, maybe. It’s bi-partisan, but barely.” He said that he has been working on this for five years.

“It’s just common-sense legislation. And it says let’s have some transparency here on regulations,” Portman said. “Let’s be sure that all the agencies and departments go through a cost analysis. You would not have had WOTUS with this legislation.” He said that with the Water of the United States (WOTUS) rule, no one went through the cost and the benefits before implementation.

Ted McKinney, the first person to serve as USDA Undersecretary, Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs, followed Sen. Brown onto the stage.

“If you wonder whether showing up makes a difference, the answer is absolutely, unequivocally yes,” said McKinney, referring to the group’s visit to Washington. “There are problems we solve by sitting across the table. When you can make your case personally, it makes a difference.”

McKinney was sworn into his position Oct. 2017. He made three main points to the group during breakfast. His points included: showing up makes a difference; quality and reputation of U.S. products makes a difference; and “we are leaving no stone unturned at the USDA.”

“We don’t get the details out through the news that they’re giving us up here [Washington D.C.]. We’re learning so much more about all the bills and everything that’s being run through that we didn’t have any idea,” said Jones.

Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs held a forum that featured several leaders of Washington — one of whom was Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. Ryan spoke briefly on the 2018 Farm Bill, regulatory reform and tax reform, and then opened up the rest of his time for questions.

“We have a welfare system that is discouraging work, that’s telling people it pays not to work, and we don’t want to keep that going,” said Ryan. He then explained that the economy desperately needs focus on career education, training and developing skills.

“Regulatory relief, tax reform, work force development, which is skills, training and welfare reform—that is a very, very good two-year agenda for agriculture, and basically for manufacturing in the whole country” said Ryan.

“We do have a philosophical divide with the role of the federal government in healthcare,” Gibbs said, answering a question about affordable health insurance and having access to preferred medical providers. Gibbs added, “That is, in a nutshell, here in Washington, what we’re struggling with.”

Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt spoke to the group attended the breakfast and touched on the water quality issue.

“This idea that we as a country have to choose between jobs and growth and environmental protection is just simply a false choice,” said Pruitt. “The way we should do business as a country is recognize that God has blessed us with tremendous natural resources, into whom much is given, much is required,” a statement to which the crowd applauded.

When Pruitt was sworn into office Feb. 2017, President Trump signed an executive order and told Pruitt to “get active and evaluate that WOTUS (Water of the United States) rule and to fix it.”

Pruitt said that within eight minutes, he had begun the process of rescinding “that deficient rule of 2015, the water in the United States rule.”

“[WOTUS] is going away and was not done the right way the first time. We’re fixing it, making sure that you have clarity,” said Pruitt. “As we go forward you’re going to have a new definition this year. In 2018, you’re going to have a new definition.”

Left to right: Kevin Dull of the Montgomery County Farm Bureau; Brandi Montgomery, Fayette County Farm Bureau President; Greene County Farm Bureau President Daniel Jones; and Congressman Michael Turner on Capitol Hill during the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.
https://www.rurallifetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/04/web1_MikeTurnerDC.jpgLeft to right: Kevin Dull of the Montgomery County Farm Bureau; Brandi Montgomery, Fayette County Farm Bureau President; Greene County Farm Bureau President Daniel Jones; and Congressman Michael Turner on Capitol Hill during the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (left) and Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs spoke to more than 100 Farm Bureau members in Washington D.C.
https://www.rurallifetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/04/web1_GibbsandRyanDC-2.jpgSpeaker of the House Paul Ryan (left) and Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs spoke to more than 100 Farm Bureau members in Washington D.C.

Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt touched on water quality during breakfast at the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.
https://www.rurallifetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/04/web1_PruittDC-2.jpgAdministrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt touched on water quality during breakfast at the 72nd annual Ohio County Farm Bureau President’s Trip.

By Amanda Rockhold

arockhold@aimmediamidwest.com

Rural Life Today