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June a good month on the Taylor farm

First Posted: 3:37 pm - July 10th, 2017 - Views

Gary Brock photo The Taylors - Stephanie, daughter Shelby and Zachary pose in one of their soybean fields on June 30.
Gary Brock photo Stephanie Taylor works on her growing garden on the family farm near Radnor in Delaware County.
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The Taylor family talk about June.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the third in a 12-part series following a year in the live of a typical Ohio farm family. Each month we will visit and report on the progress of the Delaware County farm family Stephanie and Zachary Taylor as they go through spring planting, the growing season, harvest and planning for the next year. This month: June proves a better month on the farm.

RADNOR — For Stephanie and Zachary Taylor, the month of June may have had its challenges but was by far an improvement over the last two months on their Delaware County farm.

The corn and soybeans are planted, and they are in the process of making hay and cutting wheat.

Standing next to one of their soybean fields, the Taylors talked about this past month.

“We finished all the planting two weeks ago on Tuesday, finally got all the beans planted, finished up with corn on June 3. We were delayed because of equipment failures, but that’s all back together so we are peachy keen,” Zachary Taylor said.

“Last week we focused on sidedressing corn, getting started cutting wheat and making hay. We had our daughter’s sixth birthday party, had a big bash out here for her so it’s been a little bit crazy,” he added.

When asked about June compared to the two previous months, Taylor said: “For the most part, it was a better month than April or May. We could have gotten a little more rain here and there. We were blessed with an inch of rain last night (June 29). As far as stress, the crops are pretty stress free right now. The corn is a little uneven but it is all there. That is mostly because of moisture issues. The beans have a long way to go, but we are pretty happy so far.”

Stephanie Taylor said the family has been busy. “We have been getting for our daughter’s pig show. She is going to the Louisville Summer Spectacular National Show. She’s got a market barrow and a breading gilt. That has been pretty time-consuming,” she said.

She has also been busy with the large garden at their home. She said among the vegetables planted are 16 tomato plants.

Looking over the 45-acre soybean field, Taylor explained the weeds. “It hasn’t been sprayed yet, as you can tell. I thought about replanting but decided to let it go and see what happens.” He said he plans to spray it, but needs to wait until the wind dies down.

The Taylors farm almost 30 soybean fields in the area, and about half a dozen corn fields. In total this year, Taylor said they have planted 1,647 acres of soybeans and 389 acres of corn, which is down about 200 acres from last year. In addition, they have about “75 or so” acres of wheat.

“We are down a bit in corn It’s hard to make money on $3.50 (a bushel) corn,” he said.

Regarding the market, Zachary Taylor explained: “At $8.50, you can still make a little money on beans. At $3.50 for corn, a 20 bushel discrepancy and you are losing money. It is just simple economics. For cash corn, right now you can sell it for $3.83 if you have it in the bin. If you were to market corn for October, November, or December, it is about $3.59.”

As all grain farmers are, Taylor is concerned about the health of the young plants.

“Our beans are pretty much stress free,” he said. “Some of the beans have been coming up slow. That may affect us in the fall with a later harvest. In terms of crop progress, I don’t think we are anywhere near where we should be. This week we had three nights in the 50s, and beans and corn just don’t like that. They like warm humid nights — that’s when they do the most growing. They soak up the sun all day and water and grow at night. But for what we’ve got in the ground I pretty happy. Can’t complain too much,” Taylor said.

What is coming up in July?

“We have the pig show in Kentucky, then wheat harvest, more hay to make.” he said. “The big thing will be bean spraying. Everything we’ve sprayed once we will need to spray again.”

Gary Brock can be reached at 937-556-5759.

Gary Brock photo The Taylors – Stephanie, daughter Shelby and Zachary pose in one of their soybean fields on June 30.
http://rurallifetoday.aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/07/web1_the-taylors-cmyk.jpgGary Brock photo The Taylors – Stephanie, daughter Shelby and Zachary pose in one of their soybean fields on June 30.

Gary Brock photo Stephanie Taylor works on her growing garden on the family farm near Radnor in Delaware County.
http://rurallifetoday.aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/07/web1_mrs-taylor-cmyk.jpgGary Brock photo Stephanie Taylor works on her growing garden on the family farm near Radnor in Delaware County.

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